Alternative Joinery

 

A couple of years ago, my wife asked me to take a look at one of her father’s chairs that had loosened up a little. I was not really looking forward to fixing a 30-year-old chair, especially one with little merit other than the fact that it was my father-in-law’s, but agreed to take a look at it and ‘see what I could do’. I brought it in to the shop and was startled to find that all four legs were attached with bolts running through the corner blocks to a threaded insert in the legs. The corner blocks were simply glued and screwed to the chair rails. This was fairly basic knock-down technology, but the chair had been in daily use for decades and it only needed a half turn with a wrench to tighten it up as good as new. A project I had dreaded turned into a significant lesson learned. I don’t use this approach on my regular chairs, but I find it a great method for putting together prototypes in a hurry, and in some unusual situations it has added some terrific reinforcement to otherwise difficult joints.

The leg isn't glued on, it's just bolted on through the corner block

The leg isn't glued on, it's just bolted on through the corner block

Jeff Miller